Cricket has a rich history dating back from the 16th Century through to the present day and there’s no doubt that it’s made its mark on the world of sport over the years. So why is it still second to football in many people’s eyes?

It’s likely that the majority of people asked, would probably say football is the best sport in the world, due to its sheer mass appeal and overall reach. But although it’s true that football is the number one in tems of popularity and fan base with an estimated 3.5 Billion fans around the world, cricket is actually not far behind and is the second most popular sport.

 

We still say it’s the best

With 2-3 Billion fans , Cricket has bagged 2nd place based on estimated fans round the globe. Cricket doesn’t always get its due as a premium sport, often overshadowed by other ball sports and it can sometimes be seen as an elitist sport that tends to go on for days and days. The variations of the types of matches and tournaments can be off-putting to some but I say that cricket is the best sport in the world; here’s why.

 

So what are the best things about cricket?

 

Cricketers are Hard

Image source: fun2video.com

Footballers may often claim they’ve been injured but come on…they play with a bag full air. Cricketers have hard balls of cork and leather being hurled at them at anywhere between 40-100mph! Admittedly this guy is paranoid and playing it really safe!

 

 

“Shy would we play in the rain?”

raining pitch

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Unlike football matches, who carry on in some dreadful weather, cricketers know when they are beaten. They also know how dirty those whites are going to get in wet weather. The term “forget this” is followed by the teams clearing off down the pub at the first spot of rain. Awesome.

Winning equals jumping

cricket star jumps

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Cricketers love to jump when they bowl someone out or indeed hit a six. Compared to Footballers who dance at the corner flag and pretend to play golf and tennis champions who sink to their knees in pathetically dramatic fashion, cricketers know how to have a good time and let it be known, they are awesome. Check out the running chicken celebration below:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tMBYd3dGbNY#t=18

Warriors play cricket

warrior cricketer

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Batsmen look like warriors, unlike basketball players who wear shorts too big for them and string vests, footballers who are just walking advertisements and horse jockeys, who are just…..well, short. Would you mess with this guy?

If you did, this could be the consequence…

 

 

bat - man

No crying babies, here..

crying footballers

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Undoubtedly, the most annoying thing about football has to be the constant rolling around on the floor holding their faces, or legs or arms. Get up you whiny wimps! Bag of air vs hard leather cricket ball at 100mph straight at you…. No question who wins the right to cry! Cricketers can take some proper hits and you can bet they left their acting CVs at the door.

Alcohol can be enjoyed

beer at cricket

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Whilst football clubs vote to bring back drinking alcohol in stadiums, cricket fans have enjoyed this pastime for years. No fights, no “louty” behaviour and just good old fashioned camaraderie and ribbing rivalries. So that’s sitting out in the sun, watching a great sport, with a beer, with great fans…sounds good to me!

Various Formats for everyone

clock

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Cricket can go on a bit, but it depends which you prefer to watch. Yes, you have a choice! You know what you are getting before it’s started. There are different formats to suit any fan. T20 for quick matches, or one day internationals for something more intense. Or the Test matches over 5 days. Pick one and enjoy.

Regular Breaks and a Cuppa

CUPPA

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Finally, the single best thing about cricket is how it’s typically British and how the regular breaks allow for a cuppa and a bourbon. Unlike football matches where after 90 minutes of a 0-0 scoreline, you could potentially (in a Tournament at least) have to sit through another half an hour and then penalties. A long, drawn out process which still doesn’t allow beer or a cuppa and a biscuit.